Day 10: Sense and Sensibility Chapters 42-44

March 24, 2008 at 8:03 pm | Posted in Sense and Sensibility | 4 Comments
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The Dashwoods sisters are going traveling again. Still with Mrs. Jennings. I believe they’re now staying at the Palmers’ country estate. (Mrs. Charlotte Palmer has recently had a baby. Not that that the baby comes into the story much.)

Marianne was upset at leaving London. Perhaps I’m just dense, not ‘with it’ but I don’t know why she’s so upset to be leaving. Mostly really horribly emotionally trying things have happened to her in London during her visit. You would think she’d be happy to get back to the country and out of the path of Willoughby should they ever cross. But no. She remembers London as the place where she was once happy with the idea of her and Willoughby before everything was dashed. Those first few weeks when he was avoiding her and she was driving herself crazy with worry about him. Good times. At least in retrospect. I guess this is filed under “Wish I Didn’t Know Now What I Didn’t Know Then.”

They are not there long–maybe a day or two at the most–before Marianne becomes sick. At first, almost everyone thinks its just a passing illness–nothing too serious–all but Mrs. Jennings who has a few chicken little moments. Mrs. Palmer and her baby do go away at the first hint of sickness–well the morning after the first hint of sickness. Mrs. Jennings stays with her guests and refuses to leave. A doctor is eventually called. The news changes–it’s nothing, it’s something, it’s nothing, it’s something, etc. Elinor does begin to worry especially as it seems to grow worse day by day after the initial improvement. There is a period of time–a day or two–where Marianne is delirious. Elinor fears the worst and sends for Colonel Brandon to send for the doctor and her mother.

It’s an iffy couple of days. The news of her sickness does TRAVEL far. Willoughby hears the news and rushes to see her–well, to see Elinor at least. He’s a teeny-tiny drunk, and he’s a bit full of himself in more ways than one. He’s eager to tell HIS side of the story. Why he was such a jerk. How much he loves Marianne. How much he dislikes his wife. How unhappy and miserable he is. Why Elinor should feel sorry for him in his current state. She says her feelings towards him have changed a bit. She doesn’t hate him nearly as much. But I don’t think she’s quite so eager to forgive as Marianne is. Willoughby wants Marianne to hear the reasons why. It does come out that his fiancee was the one who dictated that last letter that was so harsh. He had no choice in the matter but to send the hateful thing. Apparently.

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4 Comments »

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  1. I think Marianne is upset to leave London because this forces her to admit to herself that the dream is over – the door to her hopes closed as soon as teh door to the coach closed.

  2. I was annoyed by Marianne. Why would she be upset when London was a constant reminder of broken heart? I did enjoy how Willoughby was trying to redeem himself.

  3. I couldn’t help myself, I’ve gone ahead and finished the book already, but from what I recall, I don’t think Willoughby was trying to redeem himself in any honorable way. I think he’s an acquisitive coward and he wants it all — wants Marianne to forgive him, but wants the money his marriage offers him; wants everyone to think him the dashing hero, despite what the truth is.

  4. I too have finished the book and I do feel that Willoughby truly loved Marianne but he loved money more!! At some point his conscience got to him and he wanted to redeem himself in the eyes of the only person he ever cared for…we know for sure that he did not care in the least what happened to Col. Brandon’s ward. Marianne will come to realize that love can’t always be whirlwind.


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